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Someone once asked, “If you could take it all back, would you? At the time I didn’t know. Now I do. I wouldn’t take that terrible experience back for anything in the world. Too much light has come out of my darkness.

- Susannah Cahalan, Brain on Fire: My Month of Madness (via xx092813)

(Source: quotes-shape-us)

I am trying to see things in perspective. My dog wants a bite of my peanut butter chocolate chip bagel. I know she cannot have this, because chocolate makes dogs very sick. My dog does not understand this. When I do not give in, she eventually gives up and lays in the corner, drooping and sad. I hope the universe has my best interest in mind like I have my dog’s. When I want something with my whole being, and the universe withholds it from me, I hope the universe thinks to herself: "Silly girl. She thinks this is what she wants, but she does not understand how it will hurt.

- (via corivicious)

(Source: blythebrooklyn)

Vincent Van Gogh used to eat yellow paint because he thought it would get the happiness inside him. Many people thought he was mad and stupid for doing so because the paint was toxic, never mind that it was obvious that eating paint couldn’t possible have any direct correlation to one’s happiness, but I never saw that. If you were so unhappy that even the maddest ideas could possible work, like painting the walls of your internal organs yellow, than you are going to do it. It’s really no different than falling in love or taking drugs. There is a greater risk of getting your heart broken or overdosing, but people still do it everyday because there was always that chance it could make things better. Everyone has their yellow paint.

- (via moonsulk)

(Source: latenz)

I love being horribly straightforward. I love sending reckless text messages (because how reckless can a form of digitized communication be?) and telling people I love them and telling people they are absolutely magical humans and I cannot believe they really exist. I love saying, “Kiss me harder,” and “You’re a good person,” and, “You brighten my day.” I live my life as straight-forward as possible.

Because one day, I might get hit by a bus.

Maybe it’s weird. Maybe it’s scary. Maybe it seems downright impossible to just be—to just let people know you want them, need them, feel like, in this very moment, you will die if you do not see them, hold them, touch them in some way whether its your feet on their thighs on the couch or your tongue in their mouth or your heart in their hands.

And there is nothing more risky than pretending not to care.

We are young and we are human and we are beautiful and we are not as in control as we think we are. We never know who needs us back. We never know the magic that can arise between ourselves and other humans.

We never know when the bus is coming.

- (via bl-ossomed)
nativefaces:

This is a Tarahumara young woman, identified as Maria Salomé (identified as, meaning not her indigenous name, but the name that officials preferred to label/identify her as, with intention to further confuse/misplace people), ran in ‘K10 Marathon 2012’, and won by far! With no running shoes but sandals, no fancy sport clothing but a dress, with her hair loose… She proudly represented her indigenous people, the Tarahumara people of Chihuahua, and every indigenous woman of Mexico. History of Tarahumaras in Olympics: The Tarahumaras live in the southwestern part of the state of Chihuahua in Mexico. They shy away from contact with the outside world and remain for the most part isolated there to avoid further assimilation & colonialism. However, they are legendary long distance runners and have been doing this for centuries.“Civilization” all but ignored them, partly because of their location and also because that is how they like it. They have few “modern” conveniences and usually travel barefoot for hours between villages, often kicking a ball along the way. In fact, their endurance in running barefoot for hours at a time is legendary throughout Mexico.In 1928, the Mexican Olympic Committee decided to enter 2 Tarahumaras in the marathon race, the grueling race of over 26 miles which is the signature ending of the modern Olympics. Over the years, the best marathoners are those with extraordinary stamina who can sustain the required fast pace for over two hours. It seemed like a match made in heaven for the Mexican Committee. 2 Tarahumaras were sent to Amsterdam for the 1928 Olympics. On the final day the two took off with the rest of the runners while their Mexican trainers crossed their fingers in anticipation.But things didn’t exactly turn out the way the trainers had hoped. It seems that they forgot to tell the Tarahumaras that the race was only 42 kilometers long. When they finally appeared in the stadium and crossed the finish line they kept on running not realizing that the race was over. When the officials finally caught up with them to stop running, they pleaded, “too short, too short,” Alas, rules are rules and the officials could do very little for them.You see, the Tarahumaras are quite unique in many ways. They’ve had little contact with the so-called “modern-civilization” over the centuries, and their main method of transportation has stayed the same throughout their existence. To get anywhere they run. Not only do they run, they most often run barefoot. In fact, they run barefoot for up to 24 or 36 hours nonstop, covering distances of up to 300 kilometers, all the while kicking a little ball in front of them. But the truly amazing thing about this tribe is that they can accomplish all this at altitudes of 2,000 meters or more.

nativefaces:

This is a Tarahumara young woman, identified as Maria Salomé (identified as, meaning not her indigenous name, but the name that officials preferred to label/identify her as, with intention to further confuse/misplace people), ran in ‘K10 Marathon 2012’, and won by far! 
With no running shoes but sandals, no fancy sport clothing but a dress, with her hair loose… She proudly represented her indigenous people, the Tarahumara people of Chihuahua, and every indigenous woman of Mexico. 

History of Tarahumaras in Olympics: 
The Tarahumaras live in the southwestern part of the state of Chihuahua in Mexico. They shy away from contact with the outside world and remain for the most part isolated there to avoid further assimilation & colonialism. However, they are legendary long distance runners and have been doing this for centuries.
“Civilization” all but ignored them, partly because of their location and also because that is how they like it. They have few “modern” conveniences and usually travel barefoot for hours between villages, often kicking a ball along the way. In fact, their endurance in running barefoot for hours at a time is legendary throughout Mexico.

In 1928, the Mexican Olympic Committee decided to enter 2 Tarahumaras in the marathon race, the grueling race of over 26 miles which is the signature ending of the modern Olympics. Over the years, the best marathoners are those with extraordinary stamina who can sustain the required fast pace for over two hours. It seemed like a match made in heaven for the Mexican Committee. 2 Tarahumaras were sent to Amsterdam for the 1928 Olympics. On the final day the two took off with the rest of the runners while their Mexican trainers crossed their fingers in anticipation.
But things didn’t exactly turn out the way the trainers had hoped. It seems that they forgot to tell the Tarahumaras that the race was only 42 kilometers long. When they finally appeared in the stadium and crossed the finish line they kept on running not realizing that the race was over. When the officials finally caught up with them to stop running, they pleaded, “too short, too short,” Alas, rules are rules and the officials could do very little for them.
You see, the Tarahumaras are quite unique in many ways. They’ve had little contact with the so-called “modern-civilization” over the centuries, and their main method of transportation has stayed the same throughout their existence. To get anywhere they run. Not only do they run, they most often run barefoot. In fact, they run barefoot for up to 24 or 36 hours nonstop, covering distances of up to 300 kilometers, all the while kicking a little ball in front of them. But the truly amazing thing about this tribe is that they can accomplish all this at altitudes of 2,000 meters or more.

1. If you don’t like the way he kisses you, you won’t like the way he fucks you. Get up and leave.

2. If he won’t go down on you, but expects you to go down on him, laugh. Get up and leave.

3. If you don’t want to do something and he doesn’t respect that, slap him round the face. Get up and leave.

4. If he isn’t okay with the imperfections on your skin, if he says they turn him off, get up and leave.

5. If you don’t want to shave your legs and he thinks that’s disgusting and refuses to touch them, get up and leave.

6. If he doesn’t see your body as a masterpiece, as a complete work of art, get up and leave.

7. If he makes you feel uncomfortable about any part of your body, get up and leave.

- Get up and leave // E.E (via be-fearless-brave-and-kind)
  • 1,645,217 plays

    suckmyphallus:

    spicybutthole:

    thneedz:

    milesjai:

    This track here is not a song, nor a tune. It is a sound. A sound compiled by satanists in the early 12th century to open a door to hell to willingly given their souls to Lucifer. A sound used in 13th centure Europe during Excorisms to open the gates of hell in order to send the demon within someone back to its origins. This track is a danger to play for when it opens the gates of hell, it allows demons to enter wherever you are. Play at your own risk!!! There are certain “safe” zone where this track will not play at all and these zones are usually holy places such as churches where demons would not dare to lurk.

    Truly horrifying.

    OK ONE DAY IM GOING TO WORK UP THR COURAGE TO LISTEN TO THIS

    should i play it I’m honestly scared

    >people that are too scared to play it

    image

    (Source: dekutrickortreat)

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